These smart cooks watched the eclipse through colanders, saltine cracker

Did you get your solar eclipse pics?

I’ve been in Missouri today, tracking the eclipse on my phone and through the shadows in several pinhole viewing boxes we made.

The shadows formed by the trees were probably the most delightful surprise in this 95 percent totality zone, but I’m enjoying seeing all the Instagram photos that you took using other devices capture this moment in history.

You can use a colander to see the solar eclipse on the ground. Contributed by @mullet_baby

Despite all the coverage ahead of time, I hadn’t heard about the trick to use a colander — you know, that strainer you use to drain pasta — to make a bunch of small eclipses, but now I’m seeing lots of photos from people who used them earlier this afternoon.

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#colandereclipse #eclipse #colander #shadow #etobicoke #sun #moon

A post shared by Paul Day (@pixday) on

 

But the best pinhole eclipse shadow photo I’ve seen all day came from Twitter, where Sara Kate W posted her discovery: Saltine crackers work even better than the pinhole camera you might build from the box.

The tiny holes in the crackers are just big enough to allow the shape of the sun to come through so you can see the eclipse action.

Apparently Ritz crackers worked, too.

#eclipse #ritscrackereclipse #crackereclipse #eclipse #shadoweclipse

A post shared by Emilio (@madmanelmo) on

 

Want to see more colander eclipse pics? Check out the hashtag #colandereclipse.

 

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