General Mills recalls flours, including Gold Medal

Gold Medal flour is one of the products that General Mills has said consumers should throw away because of possible E. coli contamination. No E. coli has yet been found in the flour. Photo from General Mills.
Gold Medal flour is one of the products that General Mills has said consumers should throw away because of possible E. coli contamination. No E. coli has yet been found in the flour. Photo from General Mills.

Just as you’ve restocked the frozen vegetables you had to toss in the last recall, another major food company has announced a voluntary food call of a product nearly all of us have in our house: flour.

General Mills announced the recall today of its Gold Medal flours and the Signature Kitchens flour that is sold at Randalls, Safeway and Albertsons. No E. coli has been found in the flour or in flour manufacturing facilities, but the Centers for Disease Control is looking into 38 occurrences of illness where half the sickened individuals reported having eaten something homemade with flour, and some reported using a General Mills brand of flour.

From the release:

Based on the information that has been shared with General Mills, some of the ill consumers may have also consumed raw dough or batter. Consumers are reminded to not consume any raw products made with flour. Flour is an ingredient that comes from milling wheat, something grown outdoors that carries with it risks of bacteria which are rendered harmless by baking, frying or boiling. Consumers are reminded to wash their hands, work surfaces, and utensils thoroughly after contact with raw dough products or flour, and to never eat raw dough or batter.

Steal This Recipe: Cilantro Lime’s monkfish gazpacho

One of the many companies vying for your delivery business is Cilantro Lime, a local meal kit company that launched in 2015. Co-founder Anne Gardner has been adding dishes inspired by her international travels, including this monkfish gazpacho that she first had at a restaurant called Ambrosia in Santiago, Chile. (You can browse or order the meal kits, which cost about $20 for two servings, at cilantrolime.com.)

The sundried tomatoes and chipotle powder give the soup a smoky taste without having to add liquid smoke or actually smoke the tomatoes. The bacon and cucumber garnishes each add a crunch to complement the seared monkfish. You can use any other firm white fish or even scallops instead of the monkfish.

(Editor’s note: This post is part of an ongoing series of restaurant recipes, which obviously includes other sources that traditional restaurants. Have a favorite dish whose recipe you want to request? Shoot me a note at abroyles@statesman.com.)

Monkfish-High-ResMonkfish Gazpacho

1 medium cucumber
6 campari (or other small) tomatoes
4 sundried tomatoes
1 tsp. chipotle powder
8 cherry tomatoes
2 Tbsp. white wine vinegar
3 slices bacon
3/4 lb. monkfish
1 sprig basil

Peel the cucumber. Cut the cucumber into 1/2-inch pieces. Set aside 20 percent of the cucumbers for the garnish.

To make the gazpacho: Place the campari tomatoes, most of the cut cucumber, sundried tomatoes, chipotle powder, 1/4 tsp of salt and 1/4 cup water in a blender. Puree until smooth. Additional water may need to be added for desired consistency. Place in the fridge until plating.

Slice the cherry tomatoes thinly with a serrated knife. Combine the sliced small tomatoes, the remaining diced cucumber and white wine vinegar in a bowl.

Chop the bacon into 1/4-inch pieces. Place a large skillet on medium heat and add the bacon. Sauté until crispy. Once the bacon is cooked, remove it from the pan and transfer to a plate for later use.

Use the rendered fat from the bacon to cook the monkfish. Add the monkfish to the pan and cook until golden brown, approximately 4 minutes, then flip over and brown the other side. Do not move the fish around the pan, as this will prevent the fish from browning and will cause it to break up. Transfer the fish to a cutting board, and let rest for 3 minutes before serving.

Ladle the gazpacho into bowls. Top with the cucumbers and tomatoes. Finely slice the basil and sprinkle on top with the crisped bacon. Cut the monkfish into two portions and serve in the bowl or on the side.

— Recipe from Cilantro Lime

Green Gate Farms celebrates 10 years with a potluck, barn hug

This 114-year-old barn is one of the gems to be found at Green Gate Farms in East Austin. Photo by Tom McCarthy Jr. for the Austin American-Statesman.
This 114-year-old barn is one of the gems to be found at Green Gate Farms in East Austin. Photo by Tom McCarthy Jr. for the Austin American-Statesman.

Editor’s note: Green Gate announced today that they are postponing this event until Sept. 24.

Green Gate Farms is celebrating its 10th anniversary with a potluck and, in true Austin style, a barn hug from 4 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Sept 24. The event is free, and guests can bring a dish to share. There will be live music and farm activities, and you can find out more about the farm’s popular weeklong summer camps for kids ages 5 to 15. The weekly themed camps, which start at $350 for CSA members, start the week of June 6 and run through July 22.

The farm, 8310 Canoga Ave., is located on the 114-year-old Swedish Bergstrom farm site, and the owners, Erin Flynn and Skip Connett, were recently in the news as they negotiated an extended lease with the new owners of the land. You can find out more about the farm and all of the upcoming events at greengatefarms.net.

Austin’s ninth annual BugFest returns Saturday to Ingredients

Mealworms were on the menu at one of the annual Austin BugFest events. Photo by Deborah Cannon for the American-Statesman.
Mealworms were on the menu at one of the annual Austin BugFest events. Photo by Deborah Cannon for the American-Statesman.

Entomophagy has been a food trend du jour, but for nearly a decade, Austin bug-eaters have convened for the annual BugFest, which turns 9 this year. The event, hosted by the edible insect nonprofit Little Herds, returns from 4 to 8 p.m. Saturday at Ingredients, the market, coffee shop and beer garden at 2610 Manor Road.

Guests can learn about all the ways you can eat insects, including cricket tacos that La Condesa chef Rick Lopez will prepare in a cooking demonstration, and find out why insects are increasingly used as a source of sustainable protein. The event is open to all ages and is free to attend. You can find out more at facebook.com/littleherds.

Recipe of the week: Coconut Rice with Salmon and Cilantro Sauce

Coconut rice with salmon and cilantro sauce from "The Kitchen Shelf" by Eve O Sullivan and Rosie Reynolds. Photo by Andy Sewell.
Coconut rice with salmon and cilantro sauce from “The Kitchen Shelf” by Eve O Sullivan and Rosie Reynolds. Photo by Andy Sewell.

Coconut milk is one of the easiest ways to spiff up white rice, but this 30-minute salmon dish gets another boost from a chili flake-laced cilantro sauce. You could replace the water with oil and make a chimichurri, or use tofu or another kind of fish instead of the salmon.

Coconut Rice with Salmon and Cilantro Sauce

1 Tbsp. olive oil
1 small onion, diced
1 clove of garlic, finely chopped
1 1/2 cups white basmati rice, rinsed
1 (14 oz.) can coconut milk
1/2 tsp. superfine or granulated sugar (optional)
4 salmon fillets, skin on
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
For the cilantro sauce:
1 Tbsp. superfine or granulated sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. chili flakes, plus extra for garnish
1 large bunch cilantro coarsely chopped

Heat oil in a large lidded pan, add the onions and cook over medium heat for 10 minutes, or until softened. Add garlic and cook for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant, then add the rice and stir to coat in the oil. Add coconut milk, then half fill the empty coconut can with water and add to the pan. Add a generous pinch of salt and the sugar, bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook for 10 minutes, or until the rice is just tender and the liquid has been absorbed.

Season the salmon fillets with salt and pepper. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, place the fillet in the skillet skin-side down, and cook for 3 minutes, or until the skin is golden and crisp. Flip the fillets over and cook for another 2 minutes. Remove from the skillet and keep warm.

To make the cilantro sauce, pour scant 1/2 cup water into a small pan, add the sugar, salt and chili flakes, and bring to a boil. Simmer for 3 to 5 minutes, or until slightly reduced and syrupy. Remove from the heat.

Put cilantro into a food processor and pulse to chop. Gradually pour in the syrup and continue to pulse until the cilantro and finely chopped and the sauce is combined. Check the seasoning; it should be slightly sweet with a hint of chili.

To serve, divide the rice and fish among 4 plates, then drizzle generously with the sauce and sprinkle with extra chili flakes, if you like. Serves 4.

— Adapted from “The Kitchen Shelf” by Eve O’Sullivan and Rosie Reynolds (Phaidon, $29.95)

After ‘Shark Tank’ win, 11-year-old Austinite partners with Starbucks

meandthebeesMikaila Ulmer, the 11-year-old founder of Bee Sweet Lemonade, has some changes up her sleeve.

First, the name.

Since appearing on “Shark Tank” in March and snagging a $60,000 deal with Daymond John, Ulmer has rebranded the company to Me & and Bees Lemonade.

As with the old label, Mikaila’s face appears on the new label, and the flavors — original mint, ginger, iced tea and prickly pear — remain the same. Me & the Bees is sold in dozens of Whole Foods Markets, but this week, Ulmer announced that she has teamed up with Starbucks for an eight-week test run in all 39 Austin-area coffee shops.

Ulmer has had plenty of game-changing moments in her 7-year career as a business owner, but if Starbucks deal works out and they introduce it to more stores, it could be even bigger than the Whole Foods contract.

During an eight-week trial, the Austin-based Me & the Bees Lemonade will be sold at all 39 local Starbucks. Photo from Me & the Bees Lemonade.
During an eight-week trial, the Austin-based Me & the Bees Lemonade will be sold at all 39 local Starbucks. Photo from Me & the Bees Lemonade.

UberEats to deliver farmers market produce starting Saturday

It’s about to get even easier to buy local produce straight from a farmer.

After more than six months of delivery restaurant food in Austin, UberEats will soon start delivering produce from the downtown farmers market.

The Sustainable Food Center's Farmers' Market Downtown has partnered with UberEats to provide home delivery of boxes of produce that customers buy through the app. Rodolfo Gonzalez for the Austin American-Statesman
The Sustainable Food Center’s Farmers’ Market Downtown has partnered with UberEats to provide home delivery of boxes of produce that customers buy through the app. Rodolfo Gonzalez for the Austin American-Statesman

The company has teamed up with the Sustainable Food Center to launch a test program at the downtown market starting this Saturday. Customers can order a $20 box of produce from a number of the SFC farmers through the UberEats app for delivery to their home within a couple of hours. The program is only available in certain ZIP codes.

To order the delivery, you have to download the UberEats app. The farmers do not pay a fee to participate at this time.

Unlike Instacart, UberEats hasn’t gotten into the grocery delivery space yet, and there are plenty of other local farmers who have been handling home delivery themselves, including Farmhouse Delivery, Tecolote Farm, Johnson’s Backyard Garden and Blessing Farms, a relatively new farm 35 miles east of Austin.

Here is a list of other local community supported agriculture programs from farms around Central Texas. Lots of options, especially if you’re near some of the pick-up sites.

From Ronda Rutledge, Executive Director at Sustainable Food Center: “We are thrilled to be partnering with UberEATS to help distribute farm fresh produce from our SFC Farmers’ Market Downtown to the Austin community. This program directly advances our mission of supporting our farmers and improving access to nutritious food by creating a new and innovative marketplace.”

What do you think about this newest addition to delivery options? Will it help the farmers or increase their competition? What can’t UberEats deliver? Should Instacart be worried?

Related:

How one Austin company revolutionized how we get food delivered

How does Eat Out In compare to UberEats?

 

Like grilled corn? Consider this Japanese spin on elote

Grilled corn is such an improvement on boiled corn.

Well, really good sweet corn is so good that you don’t even have to cook it at all, but since we can’t always get that kind of corn, it’s smart to have other options.

In today’s food section, grilling writer Jim Shahin put various grilling methods to the test, concluding that you really need to soak the corn in water first and then you can grill it with or without the husk with great results.

By 8 a.m. this morning, I had an email from a reader named Kathy who suggested another way of grilling corn that we didn’t include.

This Japanese-style of serving corn includes topping the grilled corn with furikake and kewpie mayonnaise. Photo from Arnold Gatilao.
This Japanese-style of serving corn includes topping the grilled corn with furikake and kewpie mayonnaise. Photo from Arnold Gatilao.

She said that in Japan, where her husband has spent some time, they remove the husks and silk, put the ear on the aluminum foil, drizzle with soy sauce, wrap and grill. “It’s good, it’s attractive, but a little salty for me, even with low sodium soy sauce,” she writes. Seems like you could cut way back on the soy sauce and sprinkle the corn with furikake, that sesame seed seaweed seasoning that is so good on everything from fish to rice and vegetables. Oh, and roll it in kewpie mayonnaise.

How do you like to cook your corn? Do you have a favorite grilling method or are you more of a microwave kind of person?

 

Here’s your chance to eat bacon, drink a beer near COTA track

2016-BB-Austin-june-web-700x420Edible Austin had to postpone its third annual Bacon and Beer Festival earlier this spring, but the magazine has rescheduled it for 2:30 to 5 p.m. Sunday, June 12 at Circuit of the Americas.

Yes, that COTA, the one with the big racetrack. Organizers tell me that the event will take place not in one of the big conference rooms out there, but actually on and around on the balconies and paddocks above pit lane, with a view of the famed track.

Tickets cost $46.50 for general admission and $85 for VIP, and they are available at edibleaustin.com. Proceeds benefit the newly renamed Central Texas Food Bank.

Ahead of PaleoF(x), the basics of beef broth for Paleo eaters and beyond

Since these rainy, chilly spring days just keep on coming, we might as well cook accordingly. (OK, the high today is 88, but seriously, this is one long spring.)

Thanks to Paleo practitioners, broths have had an impressive revival of late, especially when sold as “bone broths.”

You’ll hear lots of people talking about them at this weekend’s PaleoF(x), one of the largest Paleo gatherings in the world. Friday through Sunday, those attending will gather to hear from cookbook authors, medical professionals and fitness experts at an event that has sold out for the past four years. There will also be an expo to showcase new products from companies including Epic, the Austin company that was acquired by General Mills earlier this year and is now selling a new line of bottled broths. (Tickets start at $30 for a day pass to the expo, and you can buy them at paleofx.com)

I didn’t care for Epic’s broths when we tried them in a recent video taste test, so I’ve been on the hunt for a homemade recipe that yields the rich broth you might have in a Chinese hotpot or Vietnamese pho.

Nick Sandler s The Magic of Broths: 60 Great Recipes for Healing Broth and Stocks and How to Make Them includes recipes for several base broths, including this one made with beef bones. Photo by Ali AllenNick Sandler’s “The Magic of Broths: 60 Great Recipes for Healing Broth and Stocks and How to Make Them” (Kyle Books, $22.95) is one of many broth cookbooks that have been published in the past year, and unlike several other recipes I’ve seen, his calls for the correct technique of roasting the bones and meat first and then simmering gently for many hours.

Eight to 12 hours on the stove seems like a long time, but you could reduce that by making this in a pressure cooker, where an hour will do. The author recommends starting this in the morning on a weekend day when you have plenty of housework and other activities around the house to do, but you can also turn off the stove and cover the pot if you need to leave the house to run an errand. “And whenever my friends ask me what the secret of a good stock is, I tell them that simmering is good, boiling is bad and patience is paramount!” he writes.

How to use this liquid gold? Sandler includes recipes for borscht, pho, Chinese hot pot, barley stew and bourguignonne — but you can also sip on it for a nutrient-packed snack or warm-up for dinner, add a tablespoon to steamed vegetables or use it to amp up sauces and gravy.

You might have to order the marrow bones ahead of time from the grocery store or butcher, but international stores with large meat counters, such as MT Supermarket, sometimes have them in stock. You can also order them online or directly from the rancher at the farmers market.

Nick Sandler's "The Magic of Broths: 60 Great Recipes for Healing Broth and Stocks and How to Make Them" includes recipes for several base broths, such as this one made with beef bones. Photos by Ali Allen.
Nick Sandler’s “The Magic of Broths: 60 Great Recipes for Healing Broth and Stocks and How to Make Them” includes recipes for several base broths, such as this one made with beef bones. Photos by Ali Allen.

Beef Broth

Use an extra-large stockpot — at least 10-quart capacity. Start tasting the broth about an hour or two before you think it might be done. You want a rich, concentrated broth, so leave off the lid. However, if too much water evaporates, you’ll have to add some back in to get the right concentration of flavor. There is plenty of flexibility in combination of meat and bones that you use, but the total should be between 4 and 8 pounds.

3 to 5 lb. beef marrow bones or shanks, cut into sections or in half lengthwise
1-2 lb. beef scraps from lean meat
1-2 lb. oxtail, cut into sections
1 lb. shallots, trimmed and cut in half
1 large head of garlic, cut in half
1 medium leek, washed and cut in half
4 celery stalks, washed and broken in two
5 medium carrots, dirt removed, cut into chunks
1 medium turnip, sliced
Small bunch of flat-leaf parsley
2 bay leaves
Handful of thyme
1/3 cup tomato paste
2 Tbsp. white wine vinegar
1 Tbsp. (1/4 oz.) porcini mushroom powder (optional)

Heat the oven to 425 degrees. Put the beef marrow bones, beef scraps, oxtail, shallots and garlic on baking sheets and bake for 1 hour, until caramelized and brown. Transfer the baked ingredients to the stockpot and top with the rest of the ingredients. Fill with enough water to just cover the ingredients.

Bring just to a boil and simmer, uncovered, for 8 to 12 hours over very low heat. Keep a watchful eye on the stock as it simmers. As the liquid evaporates, the stock will increase in temperature, so you’ll want to reduce the heat. You want to keep it gently bubbling and not boiling.

Decant through a large strainer into a voluminous bowl or saucepan and then further decant into airtight containers. Chill in a sink half filled with cold water to take the edge off the heat and, once at room temperature, place in the fridge, where it will store for up to a week.

— Adapted from “The Magic of Broths: 60 Great Recipes for Healing Broth and Stocks and How to Make Them” by Nick Sandler (Kyle Books, $22.95)